BELLPORT VILLAGE

Gallery 125 features ‘The Light That Gets Lost’ photo exhibit

Linda Leuzzi
Posted 7/16/20

With painterly and perceptive visions, Allison Davis O’Keefe and Larysa Sendich took photos of everyday places and scenes, illuminating their basic, lovely essences. Sendich’s view of …

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BELLPORT VILLAGE

Gallery 125 features ‘The Light That Gets Lost’ photo exhibit

Posted

With painterly and perceptive visions, Allison Davis O’Keefe and Larysa Sendich took photos of everyday places and scenes, illuminating their basic, lovely essences. Sendich’s view of a Montauk shoreline scene is a dreamy visual of a softly frothy tide surging in, almost blending with the sky. O’Keefe captured Ho-Hum Beach’s gazebo with a lone figure standing in the surf, looking out to sea, tinging it with a magical quality.

O’Keefe and Sendich, Bellport residents, are displaying their arresting photography work at Gallery 125, with framed and unframed photos plus an Instagram collection, through Aug. 3. They’ll be open for the Friday, July 17 Bellport Night between 5 to 7 p.m.

Snacks and happy liquids will be available.

In this calm upstairs space, their exhibit, “The Light That Gets Lost,” prompts lingering. Their collection is a reminder that, in these times, if you look for translucence and tranquility, it exists sometimes right in front of you.

Their partnership and work are offered officially under their company, Bartolome + Chey. “Most of the scenes are of Long Island; there are a few from Uruguay,” said Sendich. “We wanted to evoke the feeling Bellport brings us in the weight of the present moment.”

“We pulled it together to speak to the time,” added O’Keefe.

Besides their interesting and uplifting work, the women, young mothers, have unusual backgrounds. O’Keefe is a former CBS News producer and Sendich was practicing interior design. They met studying photojournalism at the International Center of Photography in 2009, and formed a friendship that endured.

“I worked for CBS News for 10 years, in New York, then Washington, D.C., then back in New York covering mostly politics,” said O’Keefe, who lived in New York. “I always had my own camera; although I was on assignment, I would take photos too, on my own, and CBS would use my work on their website. After the 2008 election, I wanted to focus on photography.”

Sendich, who hails from Michigan, moved to New York the year of 9/11. “My family is Ukrainian,” she said. “It’s my first language. After attending ICP, I wanted to explore the Ukrainian crisis on the land. I think that’s how I developed my photographic style. There was a lot of conflict and I explored it for personal reasons.”

This is their third exhibit.

“Bellport is very magical and inspiring,” O’Keefe said of how she found herself in the village, “so I came here first. I struggled pretty deeply after having my first child and wanted to find a place of comfort. We rented a house on South Howells and there was something healing here.” O’Keefe eventually purchased a home with her husband and now has a second child.

As for Sendich, “We crashed [at] her house for a few years,” she said, laughing. “We bought here in 2016.” Sendich has one child.

There’s a photo in the exhibit of a streetlight, surrounded by the dark, but its beam shines a definite bright shaft. (Trust us. You may have to be dragged out with your mask on; each photo taps your muse.)

“That photo evokes the light that continues to shine when people are losing hope,” said Sendich.

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